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DEVELOPING BETTER ATHLETES ONE STRIDE AT A TIME

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February 1, 2017

Elite Skating and Skill Development Camps - Summer 2017

Lloydminster - July 3rd - 7th, 2017

Includes:
• Power Skating (Technique and Power)
• Video Analysis and Athlete Testing
• Game Specific Skating
Dates: July 4th - 8th (Atom - Junior Groups Available)
• Group 1: 1:00 - 2:00 PM
• Group 2: 2:15 - 3:15 PM
• Group 3: 4:30 - 5:30 PM
Location: Servus Place, Lloydminster, AB
Cost: $300 (Group Sizes of 8 Skaters)
Registrations Are Due by June 1st, 2017

Edmonton – July and August 2017

Edmonton - July 11th – 21st , 2017

Includes:
• Power Skating (Technique and Power)
• Video Analysis and Athlete Testing
• Game Specific Skating
Dates: July 11th – 21st (Bantam - Junior Groups Available)
• Group 1: 8:30 – 9:30 AM (July 11, 12, 13, 14, 18, 19, 20, 21)
• Group 2: 9:45 - 10:45 AM (July 11, 12, 13, 14, 18, 19, 20, 21)
Location: Terwilleger Recreation Center – Edmonton, Alberta
Cost: $450 (Group Sizes of 8-10 Skaters)
Registrations Due by June 15th, 2017

Edmonton – August 8th – 18th, 2017

Includes:
• Power Skating (Technique and Power)
• Video Analysis and Athlete Testing
• Game Specific Skating
Dates: Aug 8th – 19th (Bantam - Junior Groups Available)
• Group 1: 8:30 – 9:30 AM (Aug 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 18)
• Group 2: 9:45 – 10:45 AM (Aug 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 18)
Location:
• Week 1 Terwilleger Recreation Center – Edmonton, Alberta
• Week 2 The Meadows Recreation Center – Edmonton, Alberta
Cost: $450 (Group Sizes of 8-10 Skaters)
Registrations Due by July 1st, 2016

*** Edmonton Camps Only – Register for Both Camps and Receive $100 off the Full Registration Fee

Leduc – Aug 7th – 11th, 2017

Includes:
• Power Skating (Technique and Power)
• Video Analysis and Athlete Testing
• Game Specific Skating
Dates: Aug 7th – 11th (Novice - Midget Groups Available)
• Group 1: 6:45 – 7:45 PM
• Group 2: 8:00 - 9:00 PM
• Group 3: 9:15 - 10:15 PM
Location: Leduc Recreation Center
Cost: $300 (Group Sizes of 8-10 Skaters)
Registrations Due by July 1st, 2017

If you don't see a camp which fits your schedule contact as about organizing small group ice sessions in your area!

Act fast as group sizes are limited and spots fill up fast!!

March 2, 2016

Elite Skating and Skill Development Camps - Summer 2016

Lloydminster - July 4th-8th, 2016

Includes:
• Power Skating (Technique and Power)
• Video Analysis and Athlete Testing
• Game Specific Skating
Dates: July 4th - 8th (Atom - Junior Groups Available)
• Group 1: 1:30 - 2:30 PM
• Group 2: 2:45 - 3:45 PM
• Group 3: 4:00 - 5:00 PM
• Group 4: 5:15 - 6:15 PM
Location: Servus Place, Lloydminster, AB
Cost: $300 (Group Sizes of 8 Skaters)
Registrations Are Due by June 1st, 2016

Edmonton – July and August 2016

Edmonton - July 11th – 22nd , 2016

Includes:
• Power Skating (Technique and Power)
• Video Analysis and Athlete Testing
• Game Specific Skating
Dates: July 11th – 22nd (Bantam - Junior Groups Available)
• Group 1: 10:00 – 11:00 AM (July 11, 12, 14, 15, 18, 19, 21, 22)
• Group 2: 11:15 – 12:15 PM (July 11, 12, 14, 15, 18, 19, 21, 22)
Location: Terwilleger Recreation Center – Edmonton, Alberta
Cost: $450 (Group Sizes of 8-10 Skaters)
Registrations Due by June 15th, 2016

Edmonton – August 8th – 19th, 2016

Includes:
• Power Skating (Technique and Power)
• Video Analysis and Athlete Testing
• Game Specific Skating
Dates: Aug 8th – 19th (Bantam - Junior Groups Available)
• Group 1: 8:30 – 9:30 AM (Aug 8, 9, 11, 12, 15, 16, 18, 19)
• Group 2: 9:45 – 10:45 AM (Aug 8, 9, 11, 12, 15, 16, 18, 19)
Location:
• Week 1 Terwilleger Recreation Center – Edmonton, Alberta
• Week 2 The Meadows Recreation Center – Edmonton, Alberta
Cost: $450 (Group Sizes of 8-10 Skaters)
Registrations Due by July 1st, 2016

*** Edmonton Camps Only – Register for Both Camps and Receive $100 off the Full Registration Fee

Leduc – Aug 8th – 12th, 2016

Includes:
• Power Skating (Technique and Power)
• Video Analysis and Athlete Testing
• Game Specific Skating
Dates: Aug 8th – 12th (Novice - Midget Groups Available)
• Group 1: 6:30 – 7:30 PM
• Group 2: 7:45 – 8:45 PM
• Group 3: 9:00 – 10:00 PM
Location: Sobeys Arena – Leduc Recreation Center
Cost: $300 (Group Sizes of 8-12 Skaters)
Registrations Due by July 1st, 2016

Don’t See a Camp which Works for you, Contact us about our Private and Small Group Services

Act Fast As Group Sizes Are Limited

November 9, 2015

Developing a powerful and efficient skating stride involves a lot of components including edges, balance, power, strength, technique, etc. but we find that improving a players edges can make a huge difference in improving their stride. The key to doing effective edge work drills is to keep it interesting and challenging for the players skill level.

At a younger age, we try to focus on maintaining and building speed while doing our edge work. If you watch players doing basic inside and outside edge drills (ie. half circle on the right inside edge, half circle on the left inside edge and repeat) it is common to see them get straight legged early on in the edge and standing up as they go to transition to their other leg. As a result, they do not have any extension left and can't generate any power with their push off leg. We try and get our athletes to stay low all the way through the edge and then go into complete extension as if they are pushing off for a normal skating stride. We often tell our athletes to think "load" and then "explode". This type of edge work can help with stride lengthening, power and balance as it forces players into a low skating position. With this minor change in technique, the player will be skating faster as they perform the drill and as a result be more challenged by the drill itself. From there we begin to add transitions such as forwards inside edge to backwards inside edge on the same foot, we begin incorporating inside edges on one foot and eagle turns on the other side and then we attempt the same edge work sequence with a puck with the goal of maintaining the same speed.

With our older players, we tend to focus more on small area edge work which forces players to stay low throughout the drill but at the same time try and maintain and build their speed within the small area. We allow our players to be as creative as possible with this type of drill. A simple set up is to put a few pylons, an extra net and some broken sticks inside a circle and instruct them to work on tight turns, eagle turns and inside and outside edges within the circle. If a player can build and maintain speed in a small space like this it will open up a lot of time and space on the ice for that player. With this type of drill, we are constantly telling our players to "push whenever they are in a position to push". Too many players will get into a small area and bend their knees but not go into an extended position as seen in the normal skating stride. The length and the force generated during the push is what separates good players from great players.

If you have any questions or thoughts on edge work please feel free to contact us.

Thanks
Brian Shackel, MSc

October 7, 2015

When it comes to teaching young, developing hockey players the proper mechanics of skating I usually always begin by asking specific questions to test the knowledge of individual players and groups (ie. How low should you be skating? What direction should your push be? Where should your skate recover to?, etc.) The one question which seems to come with the most confusion is "What direction should your arms be moving during the forwards skating stride?". I hear all kinds of different answers with the most common answer being to "pump your arms forwards and backwards" or "pull the rope". The thought process behind this type of arm swing is that if I am skating forwards my arms should move in the same direction that I am skating (ie. swing the arms forwards and backwards to keep them in the same plane of movement as you are skating). In theory, this make sense, but in reality it is far more complicated than this.

The idea behind the arm swing is to use it as a way to increase the amount of power which can be applied to the ice and therefore increase how fast we can skate. In order to grasp this concept, we must first understand the proper push off position. It is pretty standard across the power skating industry that players should be pushing off at a 45 degree angle in order to apply more force to the ice and increase the length of their stride. In order to maximize the amount of force which a player can apply to the ice they need to understand that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. This is the basis behind what the kinesiology world would call ground reaction forces. When our body applies a force to the ground (a push), the ground applies an equal force back onto the body. In order to increase the amount of force which we can apply to the ground I will use an off ice example from the NHL combine. When we do a vertical jump test, we inherently use our arms to help increase the amount of force which we apply to the ground and therefore, we get more force being applied back onto the body resulting in a greater vertical jump height.

In skating, a push off is no longer going directly down into the ground, but rather into the ground and outwards at a 45 degree angle. As a result, in order to increase the ground reaction force, we should try and move our arms in the opposite direction that we are pushing (not necessarily the direction we are skating). Take a look at elite level sprinters who push off directly behind their bodies when they sprint and as a result, they pump their arms forwards and backwards.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GXUXmhyN4ss

If you look at an elite level speed skater, you will notice that they move their arms in a side to side manner (most elite speed skaters push off at angles greater than 60 degrees and therefore need the sideways arm swing to increase their push off force).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMWnsBbhfw4

In hockey, the arm swing should be a combination of both of these movements (forwards/backwards and sideways) depending on the width of the players push off leg. The wider they are pushing (or faster they are skating) the more sideways their resultant arm swing will become.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkySKBCo2eA

I am going to leave you with two points to ponder:

1. Imagine a player trying to do a vertical jump test and throwing their arms out to the side when they push off the ground....

2. As the hockey season gets underway I challenge you to watch the best players in the world and see what they do with their arms when they are skating....

One of the best ways to create an efficient arm swing is to not overthink the arms and just let them do what they naturally want to do....you might be surprised with the end result!

Brian Shackel, MSc

May 4, 2015

Making Stridz Athlete Development is pleased to announce a partnership with OTHD Hockey Development and Power Edge Pro in Lloydminster, Ab for our summer camp. We will continue to offer the same small group experience we have in the past with individualized player feedback and correction. Act fast on this unique summer camp opportunity with limited space by signing up with ashaw@othd.ca. If you have any questions regarding the camp, please feel free to contact me or Aaron.

Thanks and look forwards to being part of your future development.
Brian

April 15, 2015

A few weeks back I had a great opportunity to be on the Krush Sports Performance Report to discuss Off Season Hockey Training. TSN 1260 and the Krush Sports Performance Report did a fantastic job of bringing in a few key members of the hockey development team in Barry Butt (Strength and Conditioning Coach), Manny Schmidt (Player Agent) and myself (Skating Development Coach). Check out the link below to listen to the podcast as we went through a round table discussion on what a typical off season should look like for most athletes.

http://www.tsn.ca/radio/edmonton-1260/krush-performance-march-25-hockey-...

Thanks and look forwards to being part of your development team,

Brian

March 11, 2015

Coming Soon.....

Information regarding summer camps in Lloydminster, Ab.

Thanks and look forwards to being part of your future development,
Brian

March 11, 2015

Here is a flyer for our Leduc Camp which runs from Aug 4th - 8th at the LRC in Leduc, Ab. These sessions are geared towards acceleration, change of direction, agility and top end skating speed.

MakingStridzSummer2015(1).jpg

Thanks and look forwards to being part of your future development,
Brian

March 11, 2015

Here is a flyer for our Edmonton Camp which runs through July and August at Argyle Arena. The camp is targeted towards Junior, Midget and Bantam Players at the REP level.

Argyle2015.jpg

Thanks and look forwards to being part of your future development,
Brian

February 5, 2015

I have had quite a few requests lately for both online video analysis packages as well as voice over analysis. I have uploaded a couple of samples to our youtube page to show what this type of analysis would look like. Click on the links below to see the samples:

Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_AfJgSKWx9w&feature=youtu.be

part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAl8AKF14jw&feature=youtu.be

If you have any questions regarding this type of service, please feel free to contact us for more details.

Brian

November 13, 2014

Looking to find a unique way to incorporate player development sessions into your minor hockey teams practice plans. Contact us about our baseline analysis and testing package. We will come out to your practice and coordinate a baseline testing (skating times) and video analysis session. Once we have collected the data we will then organize a follow up video session to sit down with the players one on one to work through the strengths and weaknesses of their skating stride. Once we have the data collected and have gone through the video, we will then run a follow up session to work on correcting the skating deficiencies which were noted during both the testing and video sessions. This package is a great introduction into the benefits of using video for feedback and additional sessions can be added to the package to maximize the athlete's development.

For more details on the package or to discuss other service packages targeted towards teams, please contact us at 780-932-2903 or brian@makingstridz.com

Thanks,
Making Stridz Athlete Development

August 29, 2014

Making Stridz Athlete Development would like to thank everyone who signed up for one of our camps or skated with us this past summer. It was the busiest summer we have had since starting the business up five years ago. With that being said, it is important to not let the development stop as you get back into the swing of the winter season. If you are interested in taking part in some small group skates or private sessions during the winter months, please let us know as we will be getting these organized once teams have been selected and schedules have been determined.

The summer took us all around the northern Alberta region including stops in Leduc, Lloydminster, Edmonton, Lacombe, St. Albert as well as one trip out to Brandon, Mb for a few small group skates with former Edmonton area players as well as a few local Brandonites!

Thanks for your business and hopefully everyone has a healthy and successful season!

Brian

May 21, 2014

Leduc Elite Skill Development Camp
Aug 5-9th in Leduc, Ab (Leduc Recreation Center)

Group A - 5:00 - 6:00 PM

Group B - 6:15 - 7:15 PM

Group C - 7:30 - 8:30 PM

Cost: $300/Skater (Cost includes 5 one hour ice sessions plus video analysis)

Camp is open to Atom, Peewee, Bantam, Midget and Junior players. Act fast as group size is limited to 12 skaters.

During the camp, skaters will undergo baseline testing and video to identify individual player weaknesses and then a one on one player meeting will be conducted to work through the testing results and complete the comprehensive video analysis. During the final session, players will undergo a follow up test to monitor and track progress.

If interested in signing up for the camp, please contact us at 780-932-2903 or email brian@makingstridz.com

Big on Skill Development, Small on Group Size!

May 21, 2014

Lloydminster Skating and Skills Camp
June 30th - July 4th (Servus Sports Center - Lloydminster, Ab)

Group A - 3:00 - 4:00 (Skating) and 4:30 - 5:30 (Skating/Skills)

Group B - 3:15 - 4:15 (Skating/Skills) and 4:15 - 5:15 (Skating)

Group C - 5:30 - 6:30 (Skating) and 7:00 - 8:00 (Skating/Skills)

Group D - 5:45 - 6:45 (Skating/Skills) and 6:45 - 7:45 (Skating)

Camp is open to Atom, Peewee, Bantam, Midget and Junior players. Act fast as group sizes are limited to 10 skaters.

Cost: $500/skater (this includes 10 hours of ice plus in depth video analysis of skating technique)

During the camp, skaters will undergo baseline testing and video to identify individual player weaknesses and then a one on one player meeting will be conducted to work through the testing results and complete the comprehensive video analysis. During the final session, players will undergo a follow up test to monitor and track progress.

If interested in signing up for the camp, please contact us at 780-932-2903 or email brian@makingstridz.com

Big on Skill Development, Small on Group Size!

February 12, 2014

What exactly does it take to get top end speed in hockey players?

Developing top end speed in hockey players requires a combination of multiple factors which together will create top end speed. These factors include but are not limited to off ice strength, power and explosiveness as well as the skaters ability to utilize proper technique (stride rate, stride length and body positions) in order to direct the forces into the ice. As a hockey player, you can learn a lot about what it takes to create elite level speed by watching athletes whose only purpose is to develop speed on the ice in short distance speed skaters (long and short track). These athletes all train for strength, power and explosiveness off the ice and then spend countless hours perfecting there technique to be able to apply as much force into the ice to develop speed. The best speed skaters in the world have a high combination of stride rate and length but more importantly skate with a high degree of knee flexion (or bend), go through a full range or motion on every push off, transfer their weight from the push off skate to the glide skate and push out to the side with a powerful arm swing coming forwards and slightly across their body! During the next couple of weeks, I strongly suggest you take some time to watch some of the worlds fastest athletes on ice and see if there is anything that they might be doing to generate speed that you could utilize in your daily training environment.

Brian Shackel, MSc

February 11, 2014

Congratulations to both the Lloydminster Universal Heat and SSAC Southgate Lions on very successful regular seasons. I had the opportunity to skate with several players from both these teams last summer as well as throughout the season and these players truly understand the small details which are required for elite level development! The Heat put up a +185 goal differential (230 For and 45 Against) while the Lions put up a +152 goal differential (232 For and 80 Against). These two teams are on a collision course for the North Division Final which would be a rematch of last years final which saw SSAC take down Lloydminster in three games en route to winning the Westerns! Should be a really exciting playoff run! Make sure to get down to a rink near you and check out some great playoff hockey!

February 3, 2014

The two words that get used on a daily basis with hockey coaches, players and skating instructors are Power and Explosiveness. Its great in theory to use these terms and tell our athletes that they need to skate with more power and more explosiveness, but what exactly does this mean?

When we talk about being powerful in sports, there are very few athletes and sports skills where power production is not a concern. Every time we throw or hit an object we teach our athletes to shift their weight in order to generate more "power". This same philosophy should be applied when we teach our athletes to skate. Part of what makes a great skater fast is the ability to transfer their weight from one foot to the other as they stride. Prior to the push, the athlete must load up their push off leg (get into a deep knee bend with their upper body positioned directly over top of the push off skate) and then extend their hip, knee and ankle through a large range of motion in as short of time as they can. This will create the explosive component of a great skater. As they go through this "explosive" push off, they will then transfer their weight over to the opposite leg and the cycle will begin again. The athlete must get their weight directly over top of their push off foot and load up the leg prior to starting the next push off. Athletes which are able to repeat this process over and over again with minimal time spent gliding will have great acceleration as well as top end speed. Next time you watch a game on TV, watch for a player who is chasing down a puck at full speed and watch for the lateral movement in their upper body as the weight is shifted from side to side (similar to how the push off is directed laterally).

Being an explosive and powerful skater requires a high degree of strength which must be emphasized with the athletes in their off season training programs or in the other sports they might be playing. The best combination for elite speed in hockey is to have long, powerful strides but also to keep the stride rate high in order to continually apply force into the ice!

Brian Shackel, MSc

October 24, 2013

Over the past several months, I have noticed a common trend among hockey players (especially younger developing players) of not properly transitioning from their starting technique to their forwards skating technique. This transitional phase is extremely important in hockey as rarely do we reach top speed within a game. When we work with our athletes, we try and educate them through the use of video, at what point they need to place more emphasis on stride width and length as opposed to stride rate. It goes without saying that if you have a higher stride rate and longer stride length you will be able to skate faster. However, players often get misguided when they hear coaches discuss "quick feet" in terms of their starts and this transition phase. As hockey players, it is important to emphasis a high stride rate during the first 2-3 steps, but this should not result in incomplete hip and knee extension during the push off nor should it sacrifice length. We want to achieve a balance between rate and length within our skating. As we get past 2-3 steps, our length will naturally increase as we begin to glide more on the ice, but the goal should be to go through the entire push off as "quick" as possible while getting into complete hip and knee extension in order to be in a position to start the next push. If I were to take two player who have the exact same stride length and one of them gets 2 more strides in during the length of the ice, I like my chances of saying the guy with the extra to strides will end up skating faster by the end of the rink.

The common error or trend which we see in our athletes is that they don't transition into the length early enough. This will often result in a player looking like they are "running" down the ice as opposed to "skating" down the ice. Often times these players will actually be airborne (like we would see in a sprinter) and they look like the are skating really fast when in reality they are not. In order to prevent this from happening, the athlete must begin to emphasize a more lateral (or sideways directed) push off as they take steps 3-5. Between steps 2 and 3 is when this transition should start to occur. Once we get this transition properly developed in the athletes movement pattern, we can then begin to challenge them to get into a low position with a long, wide push off throughout the remainder of their skating. As the athlete continues to skate faster, the push off angle should actually get wider and wider.

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

September 11, 2013

I know it has been a long time since our last blog post and I would like to apologize for falling off the map over the past couple of months. We had an extremely busy summer and life ended up getting a little bit hectic.

We would like to thank everyone who participated in our camps, small groups skates and one on one sessions throughout the summer. Our summer included an 8 week camp at Argyle in Edmonton, two trips out to Lloydminster, three weeks worth of camps and small groups skates in Leduc, a shortened camp in Wainwright as well as many private and small group sessions. Here are a few pictures and an article written about our Leduc camp by Alex at the Leduc Rep.

Making Stridz Athlete Development - Leduc Rep July 2013.pdf (384.63 KB)

CSC_0338.JPG
CSC_0335.JPG

Thanks again and all the best to everyone with their tryouts!

Brian

June 10, 2013

What is reactive acceleration? and how does it apply to hockey players?

Acceleration is the rate at which the velocity of a body changes in regards to time. In hockey, we are specifically concerned with the hockey players ability to move their body from a stationary (or slow gliding position) to top speed over the shortest time possible. This would result in a very high rate of acceleration for that specific athlete. The higher the acceleration, the better chance that athlete has of being the first person to the puck. The term reactive means the tendency to respond or react to a stimulus. In hockey, we will consider the puck as the stimulus (or this could be good ice or a soft spot in the defense) and we are concerned with how effectively the player can react to a loose puck. If we combine these two words into REACTIVE ACCELERATION we are interested in a player’s ability to read and react to a stimulus and then produce the greatest acceleration towards that stimulus.

What does this mean for hockey players?

As a hockey player, we spend hours working on our first step quickness and our ability to accelerate in a a linear (or straight forwards) direction. However, what happens if our hips and shoulders are facing one way and the puck squirts free at a 45 degree angle from the way we are facing. As a hockey player, we work on front starts (straight ahead) and x-over starts (straight sideways) but rarely do we work on the in between positions. What's the best footwork to use in this type of situation? Should I square up to the puck and then begin accelerating? These are all questions which hockey players should think of when they see this situation. As an instructor, the one key feature I always emphasize to my athletes is that the perfect case scenario will rarely exist and we need to practice every scenario to be prepared to make the right decision in a game. I think it’s vital that athletes are able to take their first step with either there left or right foot with very little separation in skill and ability. As a result, I think this should be practiced and focused on during skating and skill development sessions.

In order to practice this skill, it should be noted that an athlete needs to work on their acceleration through all 360 degrees of a circle in order to be able to move in any direction at any time. Once this has been accomplished, begin sliding pucks into open space or shouting out a position (ie. 4:00 or 9:00) and have the athlete react to the stimulus and respond appropriately with good skating technique!

Brian Shackel, MSc

April 22, 2013

Click on the link below to view our summer camp flyer. The camp is currently set up for Bantam, Midget and Junior players. If you do not fit into the catagories outlined, please contact us as we are currently putting a list togethor for A/AA PeeWee players looking for small group skates this summer and will be looking into potential dates in August.

Making Stridz Elite Skill Development Camp - Summer 2013

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

April 12, 2013

Yesterday I sent out a tweet regarding the improper naming of cross overs in hockey and how this improper naming might have a correlation to the poor technique which has been noted in many developing hockey players. I thought it might be a good idea to elaborate on this by showing a couple of different examples and further explaining my rationale for the tweet.

In order to properly generate power during a cross over, the athlete must drive the pushing skate into the ice by going through a complete range of motion (into full extension) over a very short period of time (as fast as they can extend). What this motion will do is provide a higher angular acceleration of the hip, knee and ankle joints and therefore increase the force which can be applied to the ice. When coaches and parents focus more on the cross over component, players tend to focus in too much on getting the skate all the way over and forget that they need to push with the other skate. If the athlete goes into complete hip, knee and ankle extension on the push off skate, there is a very good probability that they will have a large cross over component as well.

If you look at the images shown below, you will notice that the image on the left shows an athlete going into limited hip, knee and ankle extension. This is shown by the large knee flexion (or bend) still remaining in the cross under leg. However, the athlete on the right has gone into more complete hip, knee and ankle extension (minimal bend remaining) and this has produced a larger cross over and more power created during the push.

CrossUnderComparison.jpg

The term triple extension is often used by sprinters when they are working on going into complete extension during the push off motion in running. This is not unlike the motion we are looking for in hockey. If we can achieve triple extension during our cross unders (complete extension of the hip, knee and ankle) we will be able to generate more power in our pushes and therefore generate more speed. This same rule of thumb applies in the forwards skating stride. In order to maximize our speed and efficiency on the ice, we need to focus on going into triple extension. Once again, this would include complete extension of the hip, followed by the knee and followed by the ankle (often referred to as the toe flick).

Brian Shackel, MSc

March 22, 2013

Over the past three weeks I have been filming athletes at a variety of sports academies in and around Edmonton performing two separate transitional agility skills. The idea was to gain a better understanding of the best way to perform a 180 degree change of direction. The two options were a tight turn around a pylon or a stop-start between two pylons. During the turn, the pylon was moved forwards 18 inches in order to allow the athletes to position their inside skate at the same position it would be during the completion of the stop. After filming 148 athletes (a reasonable sample size) and calculating their times to complete both skills the results are as follows:

Tight Turn - 26.4%
Stop-Start - 58.1%
Same Time - 15.5%

These results brought forward several questions to my researcher based mindset. Are athletes significantly better at performing a stop-start than a tight turn providing us with biased results? Is the stop-start that much better than the tight turn? If I changed the distance which the filming and times were based on would the results change significantly or would they be the same? My initial thought is that we need to focus significantly more on the development of our tight turns as many athletes are unable to control their body and speed during the turn which provided them with a significantly slower time.

Throughout the summer, I am hoping to get more answers to these questions with the groups which I will be working with. If you have a hypothesis or thought on this topic, please feel free to email them to me brian@makingstridz.com or tweet me @MakingStridz.

Thanks,
Brian

March 11, 2013

This past week I had the opportunity to attend the Own the Podium Performance Analysis workshop in Ottawa. Performance Analysis is one of the fastest growing fields in the Canadian Sport System due to the incredible advances in technology over the past 10 years. As technology continues to advance so too will this field of work. As a Performance Analyst, our goal is to provide coaches, athletes and managers with as much information on an athlete’s performance (both tactical and technical) in order to help them make decisions about improving the performance of the individual athlete or team as a whole. If you are interested in learning more about the field of Performance Analysis, please feel free to contact us to set up an initial consultation.

Regards,
Brian Shackel, MSc

February 20, 2013

With the playoffs just around the corner or already started for many hockey players, now is the best time of the year to begin thinking about your off season training plans. Should you enroll your son/daughter in power skating camps, skill development camps, spring hockey or off-ice strength and conditioning programs. The Edmonton area is unique in the fact that it has some of the best service providers the hockey industry has to offer, however, how do you know what services would best suit your son/daughter?

Making Stridz Athlete Development would like to help simplify this question and get you on the right track for your summer planning. To be involved in this unique opportunity, contact us about our online video analysis program and functional movement screen services. By providing us with video of your son/daughter performing a set of pre-determined skating drills and skills we can help identify specific areas of weakness in their skating or skill development. Combining this with a functional movement screen, we can help to identify specific areas of muscle weakness and/or tightness in their movement patterns. Following the screen, we can begin to clarify the picture of what services your son/daughter could benefit from the most in their off season training and help suggest camps and or coaches in your area to help maximize their potential.

Thanks for your time and look forwards to talking with you in the near future.

Regards,
Brian Shackel, MSc

February 20, 2013

With the playoffs just around the corner or already started for many hockey players, now is the best time of the year to begin thinking about your off season training plans. Should you enroll your son/daughter in power skating camps, skill development camps, spring hockey or off-ice strength and conditioning programs. The Edmonton area is unique in the fact that it has some of the best service providers the hockey industry has to offer, however, how do you know what services would best suit your son/daughter?

Making Stridz Athlete Development would like to help simplify this question and get you on the right track for your summer planning. To be involved in this unique opportunity, contact us about our online video analysis program and functional movement screen services. By providing us with video of your son/daughter performing a set of pre-determined skating drills and skills we can help identify specific areas of weakness in their skating or skill development. Combining this with a functional movement screen, we can help to identify specific areas of muscle weakness and/or tightness in their movement patterns. Following the screen, we can begin to clarify the picture of what services your son/daughter could benefit from the most in their off season training and help suggest camps and or coaches in your area to help maximize their potential.

Thanks for your time and look forwards to talking with you in the near future.

Regards,
Brian Shackel, MSc

February 1, 2013

Click on the link below to read an interesting article on the benefits of technology in the sporting world. Not only are athletes getting bigger, faster and stronger, but we are also equipping them with every tool neccesary to monitor and track every aspect of their performance.

http://dsc.discovery.com/technology/tech-10/sports-tech/10-techs-transfo...

Brian Shackel, MSc

January 28, 2013

In the world of sports training, the term "first step quickness" gets used almost as frequently as the term "functional training" does in the weight room. What exactly does it mean when a coach or trainer tells you they are going to work on your "first step quickness"? or if you are a hockey player, what does it mean when a coach tells you that you are going to be working on "explosive starts"?

The terms "first step quickness" and "explosive starts" are terms which athletes and parents like to hear when someone is working with them, but how do we achieve this and what exactly does this mean? In order to be explosive or quick, we must understand the term impulse. Impulse is the amount of force which is being applied multiplied by the time over which the force is acting. This term is extremely important in the sports world, but especially when we are talking about an athlete’s ability to accelerate from a stationary position whether they are on or off the ice. In order to generate first step quickness, we must be able to generate a large force over an extremely short period of time. This helps to explain the term "quick feet" which can be heard from every hockey coach, instructor, player or parent anywhere there is a sheet of ice and a hockey game being played. However, as a player, it is important to realize that having quick feet is important but without the force, you are not going to be able to generate a large impulse. We need to have an emphasis on pushing all the way through into complete hip, knee and ankle extension during the push, but moving the feet as quickly as possible in order to be in a position to start the next push off. This holds true for the first two - three steps on ice and slightly longer off ice due to the glide phase which occurs in the skating stride. So next time you are training, either on or off the ice, think about completing your push off through hip, knee and ankle extension while emphasizing a high stride rate during the initial steps and you should see your "1st step quickness" improving.

Brian Shackel, MSc

January 25, 2013

Last night I sent out a tweet regarding the importance of ankle mobility in skating. When you sit down to watch a game over the weekend, pay careful attention to the lower half of the body in all of the top players in the game. If you watch very carefully, the one thing you should notice is that all of these players do an excellent job of going into a position of deep ankle dorsiflexion. Ankle dorsiflexion is bringing the toe closer to the shin by flexing the ankle. In terms of hockey skating, this position will result in the knee moving forwards while the skate blade stays flat on the ice. In doing this, the athlete moves their weight forwards (onto the balls of their feet) and puts them in a better position to apply force into the ice. An ideal position would be to get the middle of the knee joint directly over top of the front or toe of the skate. As we work our way up the kinetic chain, the athlete will gain significantly more knee flexion from this movement which will increase their balance, stability and stride length. It’s important to focus on building the hockey stride from the ground up in order to increase speed, power and performance! So next time you step on the ice, check to see how much ankle mobility you have when fully dressed!

Brian Shackel, MSc

January 11, 2013

Making Stridz Athlete Development would like to wish all teams and players involved in Edmonton Minor Hockey Week the best of luck over the next couple of days.

We would also like to provide the teams and players in the Edmonton area with a unique Skill Development opportunity. Through the use of cutting edge technology, Making Stridz Athlete Development can provide immediate on-ice video feedback to coaches and players in terms of their body mechanics and positions while playing hockey. This can include an anlysis of the forwards skating stride, starts and acceleration, shooting technique or goalie specific movements (crease movements and save technique). Contact us for more information on availability and pricing (team and individual pricing is available) or check out the Biomechanics and Media Gallery tabs on our website!

Thanks and best of luck this weekend,
Brian Shackel, MSc

January 7, 2013

The NHL and NHLPA have finally reached an agreement (one which most people have created numerous times prior to the start of the 2012-13 season at their local watering whole). I think the whole world seen a 50/50 split coming! Now comes the fun part. With players coming back into a shortened training camp (likely to be less than 10 days) and players coming in from a variety of different fitness levels (some in game shape, some in pre-training camp shape, and others not in shape at all) it is likely that we will see an entirely different season than normal. It is probable that more players will suffer minor tweaks and pulls than normal, but are these injuries something which owners/managers should be concerned about. The answer to this question is an overwhelming YES! As professional athletes, these players should have been treating this strike similar to an extended summer training program. This should have included regular maintenance (soft tissue therapy) as well as a focus on addressing other weakness, imbalances or asymmetries in their body. I am sure you could talk to numerous strength and conditioning coaches and get numerous different answers as to what the players should have been doing during this extended summer training camp. However, I think that all of them would put a focus on regular maintenance and extended prehab in order to make sure that the athletes are prepared to start the season at any given time. From an on-ice perspective, the players should have continued to maintain some form of on-ice conditioning similar to what would normally occur at the end of the summer. This might be getting on ice 1-2/week and progressing up to be on the ice 3-5 times/week as they near the start of the season. The one thing that is certain, those players who have been playing and practicing in "real game situations" (KHL, AHL, CHL or other European Leagues) will likely have a significant advantage over the first 3-4 weeks of the season, but we will have to wait until late July to understand the true effects in terms of conditioning and who was best prepared for the grueling season which is set to start on Jan 19th!

Brian Shackel, MSc

December 3, 2012

Here are a couple of unique gift ideas for the sports enthusiast in your family:

Intelliskin Posture Shirt:
Click on the link on our homepage for more information on this product. Intelliskin products are endorsed by many professional athletes as being beneficial in terms of performance both on and off the field. This product can be worn during both training and performing in order to improve your posture and help decrease fatigue. By improving your posture during physical activity, you are better able expand your rib cage, leading to improved breathing and better supply of blood and oxygen to the muscles. This gift idea is definetly worth some thought for the athlete in your family.

Nike + Basketball:
Click on the link below to learn more about this relatively new product.
http://allthingsd.com/20120222/nikes-new-high-tech-sneakers-will-tell-yo...
This product is designed to provide basic biomechanics information on ground reaction forces during your sport or activty.

Looking for something more unique. Contact us about setting up a Biomechanics Assessment for the athlete in your family. We offer a variety of different services and packages to suit your budget.

Happy Holidays from Making Stridz Athlete Developmemt!

Brian Shackel, MSc

November 9, 2012

Making Stridz Athlete Development will be assisting the coaches and instructors at St. FX Hockey Academy this month on incoorperating technology into the learning process for hockey players. We will be providing immediate on-ice video feedback to the student athletes on transitional acceleration (stop-change of direction-start)and forwards skating mechanics. We will also be working with the goalies on positioning, save mechanics and recovery. Big thanks to Jason and his staff for having us out! Check out their website to learn more about their academy (http://www.stfxhockey.com/) and be sure to follow us on twitter or like us on facebook!

Brian Shackel, MSc

October 22, 2012

Making Stridz Athlete Development would like to welcome the players, parents and coaches from three new hockey academies this month.

Beaumont Hockey Academy - https://sites.google.com/site/beaumonthockeyacademy/home

Warburg Hockey Academy - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Warburg-School-Hockey-Academy/112445375503064

Paul Kane Hockey Academy - http://pkhs.spschools.org/pk-hockey-academy

Thanks for bringing me on board this hockey season. Remember to take the feedback that you received from myself as well as any other coaches you might have worked with and apply it to your on ice sessions. It is important to create good habits in order to foster positive change in a skill.

Thanks again and good luck with the upcoming season.

Brian Shackel, MSc

September 19, 2012

In the world of hockey and specifically with coaches/instructors who are focusing on "power skating", the term "explosive" gets used on a continual basis. For example, a coach might tell their athlete "you need to be more explosive on your starts" or "I want you to work on having a more explosive first step". What exactly does this mean?

When we talk about an athlete's ability to be explosive, what we are actually talking about is the ability of the athlete to generate mechanical power. Power is defined as the amount of work done divided by the time during which the work was done. In this case, the work is the force which was applied to do the work multiplied by the displacement which the object experienced. More specifically, when we measure an athlete’s power, we are looking at how fast they can move a certain weight. In hockey, we are trying to move our body weight the greatest distance over the shortest amount of time in order to generate more power. When we come back to our hockey start, what things can we emphasize or look for to ensure that we have an explosive or powerful first step....

Tip #1: In order to be able to apply force effectively in a hockey start, the athlete must flex (or bend) their knees and keep their head and chest upright. This position is important as it helps to pre-load the muscles of the lower body for the work which they are about to perform. The athlete does not need to get the skates into a "V" with the heels touching but they should be shoulder width apart and turned out slightly in order to be in a better position to push back into the ice during the first push.

Tip #2: We need to encourage our athletes to generate power by emphasizing a long first step. The idea behind the first step is that it should get us closer to the puck and put us in the best position to take the next step. What that means is that the first step should be as long as the player can take without allowing for their foot to get out in front of their body.

Tip #3: Do NOT overstride. As much as we want to encourage a long first step, the athlete must keep this in reason and not allow themselves to plant their foot too far out in front of their body. By doing this, the athlete creates a braking force and actually slows themselves down during the subsequent push off.

Tip #4: At skate touchdown, the first 2-3 steps should be up on the balls of the feet with the heel off the ice. This is important as it creates additional power by activating the stretch reflex and also encourages the athlete to not allow a glide to occur during the initial 2-3 steps.

Tip #5: The athlete should strive to keep their knee out in front of their toe at all times as this encourages a high degree of knee flexion from the athlete but also moves the athletes center of gravity more over top of the balls of the feet.

Tip #6: With each successive step, the athlete should take longer steps and also generate more of a lateral push off. For example, the first push off should occur directly backwards and then the subsequent push offs should occur more out to the side as the glide begins to occur.

There are many more tips which we have not covered here, but focusing on these 6 key points should help get you in a more explosive position and therefore help you create a more explosive first step.

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

August 28, 2012

Click on the link below to view a comparison video of a top level Bantam Prospect after spending 8 days working on 1st step quickness and acceleration.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTiUF731cRs&feature=plcp

Contact us to learn more about setting up on-ice video analysis and camps in your area.

Thanks,
Brian

July 10, 2012

Making Stridz Athlete Development would like to thank Kevin Bathurst and the staff at Hockey Canada for organizing a very succesful conference this past week in Calgary. The conference focused around both on and off ice skill development for coaches and athletes. Thanks again for the invite and hope to be involved with Hockey Canada again in the future.

Regards,
Brian Shackel, MSc

June 29, 2012

With the London Olympics only 27 days away and athletes undergoing the final Olympic Trial Competitions to determine who will represent their country, there are bound to be several disappointed athletes who might have seen their best chance to make the Olympics pass them by. With that being said, there will also be athletes who sneak up and surprise at the trials and receive an Olympic berth and those who were expected to represent their countries will continue to do so.

The majority of these athletes have been spending every day of the past four years of their life training, practicing and competing to get a chance to represent their country. At the Olympic level, the difference between gold and silver or qualifying and not qualifying comes down to the smallest details. As a result, athletes will be spending countless hours working with their performance team including Coaches, Physiologists, Psychologists, Performance Technologists and Biomechanists. Research from the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver showed that 62% of athletes which one medals were using Dartfish Video Analysis as a means of providing instant or delayed feedback to improve their technique. Will this trend continue at the summer Olympics? I think it is fair to say that this trend will not change anytime in the near future as coaches and athletes rely heavily on feedback to make minor changes in technique. These changes can be significant in helping athletes reach the podium as events can be determined by as close as 1/100 of a second....

Keep this in mind in your own sports career. Working with a Biomechanist and a "Performance Team" can help you improve your sports performance and therefore help you to reach your goals!

Thanks and have a safe and happy Canada Day Weekend!

Brian

June 4, 2012

Making Stridz Athlete Development is pleased to offer an elite skill development camp for players in the Edmonton area looking to take their game to the next level. The camp will focus on improving all aspects of player development, but with a strong emphasis on skating development (including maximum speed, acceleration, transitional speed and tight turns). All players will undergo a skating mechanics assessment during the first session in order to identify strengths and weaknesses in the players skating ability to determine what key points need to be emphasized throughout the remainder of the camp. During the next four sessions, players will work one on one with our Biomechanist on a specific skill (ie. acceleration, tight turns, shooting) with immediate on-site video feedback being provided to the player. This will allow us to make adjustments in the players skill and re-film the skill in order to determine if the changes have been made. The goal of these sessions is to teach the player how to "see, feel and understand" when the correct movement has been done. During the time when a player is undergoing their one on one session, the remainder of the group will be working with the second instructor in order to gain the quality repetitions which are required to make a change in a skill. Our goal is to put your son/daughter through as many quality repetitions as we can during the six ice sessions. During the final ice session, we wll re-film the players and go through a side by side comparison to see if the corrections we outlined during the initial session were successfully completed.

Camp Information:

Instructors:
Brian Shackel, MSc - Owner Making Stridz Athlete Development
Steve Goertzen - Current playing professional with experience in the NHL, AHL and European Professional Leagues

Location:
Leduc Recreation Center

Dates:
Monday July 9th, 2012 (7:45 PM - 8:45 PM)
Tuesday July 10th, 2012 (8:45 PM - 9:45 PM)
Thursday July 12th, 2012 (7:45 PM - 8:45 PM)
Monday July 16th, 2012 (7:45 PM - 8:45 PM)
Tuesday July 17th, 2012 (7:45 PM - 8:45 PM)
Thursday July 19th, 2012 (7:45 PM - 8:45 PM)

Registration:
To register, please contact us via phone or e-mail. Deadline to register is June 15th, 2012. Act fast as sports are limited to 8 skaters. Open to Bantam, Midget and Junior Players.

Cost:
$350.00 plus tax (with a 20% deposit due during registration)

Click here to view the camp flyer:
MakingStridzSummerCamp2012.pdf (363.1 KB)

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

May 15, 2012

With the off season training program starting up for most of the players, I thought I would provide everyone with some reading material and information regarding the transferability of off ice sprint work to on ice skating. When breaking down the first two steps of an elite level sprinter and comparing this to an elite level hockey player, you will notice that there are a lot of similarities between the two skills. Check out the video below to see a side by side comparison of the two skills.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bt2IK8j5SM0&feature=youtu.be

This comparison suggests that there is a high degree of transferability between the two skills. When looking at the 1st two steps of a hockey skating stride, the key variable which remains the same as sprinting is that the athlete is pushing off on a fixed point of contact (or there is very little to no glide present). As a result of this fixed point of contact, the athlete will want to emphasize a "sprinter like" mentality of driving off in the backwards direction and pushing directly into the ice. If you watch the video closely, you will notice that both athletes have a high degree of knee flexion in their support leg with the knee well out in front of the toe. This allows for the athlete to position their center of gravity directly over top of their support skate and therefore allow for a quicker stride rate (this is where the term "quick feet" initially came from). Both athletes will emphasize a strong arm drive and complete hip and knee extension (or triple extension) during the push off. This is important as it helps to produce more power during the force producing phase of the skill. The emphasis should be on the pushing leg driving into the ice, rather than the recovery leg being placed in front of the body. If the athlete tries to over reach (or overstride) then they will begin to experience a delay in their upcoming push off and therefore a slower rate of acceleration.

After the initial two steps, the hockey player will no longer have a fixed point of contact but rather a glide which will require a more lateral push off and therefore a transition in their skating stride. As the push off becomes more lateral, you should notice a slight change in the athletes arm swing as it will modify slightly in order to counterbalance the motion occurring at the lower body. This change will primarily result in the arms coming slightly across the front of the body in order to increase the ground reaction forces being applied to the ice. As the athlete continues to accelerate and gets closer to full velocity, the push off should become wider and as a result so will the arm swing. Note that there is a transitional phase where the athlete builds up the length of the skating stride as well as the width with each successive push off.

I have attached a couple of articles discussing the correlation of sprint work and other off ice testing to on ice skating.

http://www.nsca-lift.org/Perform/articles/04056.pdf

http://www.hockeytraining.eu/wp-content/uploads/Relationships-to-skating...

Thanks,

Brian Shackel, MSc

April 16, 2012

The final principle is unique in nature as it only applies to objects which are airborne or on surfaces which have extremely low coefficients of friction. An excellent example of this principle is figure skaters. Have you ever watched a figure skating competition and wondered how the athletes are able to complete a stationary spin on ice while increasing and decreasing their rate of spin. This motion is made possible due principle #7 and the conservation of angular momentum.

Angular momentum is the product of inertia (a body’s resistance to changes in motion) and that body’s angular velocity. As a result, in order to maintain a constant angular momentum, the figure skater can manipulate their body in order to increase its inertia, while subsequently decreasing its angular velocity or visca versa. In the figure skating example, the figure skaters will utilize their arms in order to decrease their inertia (bring the arms closer to their body) which in turn causes them to increase their rate of spin or angular velocity. As they near the end of the spin, they will move their arms further away from their body (increasing their inertia) which in turn will cause a decrease in their angular velocity and slow down their rate of spin.

This principle also plays a vital role in the success of elite level divers. When the diver moves from a layout position to a tuck position, they are ultimately manipulating their moment of inertia in order to adjust their angular velocity. If the divers timing is off, they will not make a clean entrance into the pool. This is part of the reason why you will see divers break form (ie. flex the knees) near the completion of their jump in order to increase their velocity in hopes of making a cleaner entrance into the pool. Elite level divers are extremely gifted in knowing where they should be when coming out of a dive in order to make a clean entrance into the water. This is where repetition and quality feedback from the coach and/or Biomechanist can help to improve the diver’s performance and overall score on a dive.

Brian Shackel, MSc

April 12, 2012

Making Stridz Athlete development will be presenting a free seminar called "Science of Running: Technique + Prehab =Performance" at the Leduc Health and Wellness Fair on April 12th, 2012 at 7:30 pm in the Venger Room at the Leduc Recreation Center!

If you’re just starting out running or have many running miles behind you, this workshop will help improve your performance. We will disucss a wide variety of topics including the much debated topic of "heel striking vs. forefoot running" as well as provide some strength and soft tissue exercises to improve your running performance!

http://www.leducleisure.com/2012_LRC_health-wellness_poster.pdf

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

April 11, 2012

When looking at the principle of angular motion, it is important to have a solid understanding of several other biomechanics terms.
• Angular Velocity = change in angular position (or displacement) / change in time
• Torque = Force X Distance (perpendicular)

In order to generate angular motion, a force must be applied onto an object acting a certain distance away from the object. As a result, in order to increase the torque, an athlete can either increase the force which they are applying to an object or apply this force further away from their axis of rotation.

A classic example of angular motion is the throwing arm of a baseball pitcher. Professional baseball players are able to generate extremely high angular velocities in their throwing shoulder (specifically internal rotation of the pitching arm) which increases the linear velocity of the ball coming out of the hand. If you consider the baseball pitcher as an example and use the pitchers spine as their axis of rotation and the perpendicular distance from the ball to the axis of rotation as their distance, you will be able to determine ways to increase the linear velocity of the ball at release. A pitcher can produce a larger torque by applying a larger force or by moving this ball further away from the axis of rotation. Unfortunately, this example is not a simple as we just described it, but it does give you a valuable reference point. For a pitcher to truly increase the velocity of the ball at release, they need to factor in nearly every biomechanical principle we have talked about to date. Specifically, the pitcher needs to emphasize the principles which help to produce maximum effort or force (principles #2 and #3) as well as the principles which apply to linear motion (principles #4 and #5). Throwing a baseball requires full body mechanics and factors in linear and angular movements as well as the importance of proper sequencing of these movements.

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

April 2, 2012

This principle seems relatively straight forward upon first glance, but there are some key features to focus on when applying this principle to your sport. Liner motion is motion along a line that may be straight or curved, with all parts of the body moving in the same direction at the same speed.

Running is most likely the best example of Principle #5 as it is true linear motion. When an athlete is running, the primary direction of force application is down into the ground and in the backwards direction. If you look at the runner who is “bouncy” they most often are applying too much force down into the ground which results in them becoming more of a vertical projectile, however, if you look at the runner who has no vertical deviation of their center of gravity, they are applying force primary in the backwards direction. This relationship also holds true when looking at long jumpers vs. high jumpers. A long jumper will apply more of their force backwards, causing them to be more of a horizontal projectile, while a high jumper will apply more of their force down into the ground in order to become a vertical projectile.

An interesting example of this principle which might fall under the area of “movement usually” occurs in the direction opposite to that of the applied force is skating in hockey. If you look at the below image you will gain a greater understanding of an example where the direction of force application might not cause motion in the opposite direction.

Skating Ice Pattern.jpg

When you watch a highly skilled hockey player skate down the ice going from a stationary position into maximum velocity, it is fair to say that the player will skate in almost a perfect straight line. With that being said, based on Principle #5, the direction of force application should occur 90 degrees to the direction of travel (or the push off skate should move directly behind the athlete into true hip extension). However, if you look at the tracings on the ice in the image above you will see that the force application angle moves from 90 degrees to the direction of travel to 45 degrees to the direction of travel. This change in push off angle does not cause a change in the direction which the hockey player is heading. Furthermore, when you factor in Newton’s 3rd Law of Motion that for “every action there is an equal and opposite reaction” you can begin to discuss the use of the arms in the skating stride. I think most people would agree that a runners direction of force application is directly backwards (in the sagittal plane) and as a result, the runners arms should move primarily in the forwards/backwards direction in order to improve the rhythm of the runner and increase the force which can be applied to the ground. When you bring this same concept to a hockey player, you will notice that the direction of force application is 45 degrees to the direction of travel. What does this mean for the arm swing? Should the arms move opposite to the direction of travel or opposite to the direction of force application? I am of the belief that the arm swing should move forwards and across the front of the athletes body as the push off skate is moved backwards and away from the athlete’s midline. For more information on this debate, review the article written by Dr. Marion Alexander from the University of Manitoba:

http://www.coachesinfo.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=...)

and the video by Dr. Michael Bracko from The Hockey Institute:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=TrAAoE039Vk).

Definitely food for thought for those hockey players, parents and coaches! Feel free to pass your comments onto me regarding this debate…..

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

March 26, 2012

What is impulse (I)?

Impulse is the product of force (F) and the time (t) over which the force acts (I=Ft). With that being said, when a force is applied to an object, the resulting motion of the body is dependent not only on the magnitude of the force but also on the duration of the force application. Therefore, an object can be set in motion by applying a large force over a relatively short period of time or a small force over a relatively long period of time. Both of these impulses can create motion in an object, but what is more effective at producing motion in sports.

One of the most common examples of impulse in sports is the volleyball player who jumps up to spike a ball during a match. Theoretically, the volleyball player has two options. Option number one, the volleyball player could apply a relatively small force over a longer time frame to produce an impulse. Option number two, the same volleyball player could apply a large force over a relatively short period of time to produce the exact same impulse. However, in theory this makes sense, but when it is put into practice, the volleyball player who choses option two will generate more vertical velocity and has a much higher jump height. In sports or activities which require more “explosive movements” a large force applied over a short time frame will produce a much better result. Another example of this is a hockey player attempting to take slap shot. The hockey player can produce a much harder shot if the force is applied to the puck over a very short period of time (ie. the less time the puck is on the stick, the harder the shot).

With that being said, there are several examples in sports where it is important to produce less impulse. For example, a hockey player receiving a pass or baseball player receiving a ground ball will want to allow the time of force application to be increased in order to decrease the force with which the object is received. This is done by cushioning the pass or grounder. A hockey player is taught to have soft hands and allow the puck to hit the stick and absorb the puck. This motion allows the force to be absorbed over a longer period of time, thus decreasing the overall impulse. Have you ever heard you coach say that receiving a pass should be “quiet”? In the baseball example, the fielder will absorb the force of the ball by bringing the hands into the body and transitioning it into a throw. The longer time spend absorbing the force, the less the impulse which will be applied to the glove and hand. This principle can help ease the pain of the baseball player who catches the ball in the palm of the glove without allowing time to absorb the ball.

Check back next week for more in Linear Motion and Principle #5!

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

March 22, 2012

In case you missed "The Nature of Things: The Perfect Runner". Click on the link below:

http://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episode/the-perfect-runner.html

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

March 19, 2012

The production of maximum velocity requires the use of joints in order – from the largest to the smallest. Now that you have a greater understanding of using all of the joints possible to produce maximum force, it is important to gain a greater understanding of the sequential timing of these movements.

A classic example of using your joints from largest to smallest is found in almost all rotational skills (ie. throwing a shot, hitting and throwing a baseball, hitting a golf ball, etc). During these sports skills, it is important to utilize “segmental rotation” where the rotational velocity of one joint is transferred into the next joint. For example, if you look at a golf professional hitting a ball, you will notice a very distinct sequence of events……

1. During the takeaway, the golfer will turn the shoulders back prior to turning the hips back which will create “shoulder hip separation” at the top of the backswing as well as allow the golfers weight to be transferred to the back foot.
2. The downswing will be initiated with the hips rotating counter clockwise (for a right handed golfer) while the shoulders “lag” behind and start their movement slightly after the hips. This allows the hips (the larger joint) to move prior to the shoulders (the smaller joint) and start the process of segmental rotation.
3. The shoulders will then begin the downswing in a counter clockwise direction while the hand elbow and hand “lag” behind. The elbow and hand will begin to move in the counter clockwise direction leaving the head of the golf club behind.
4. Finally the club head will begin the downswing and continue to accelerate through impact.

By going through this distinctive series of events, the angular velocity of the hip rotation (the initial movement) is able to be transferred into the shoulders, the shoulders into the elbow, elbow into the wrist and wrist into the club head. This allows the club head to be travelling at its maximum velocity leading up to ball contact. If one of these motions is done out of order (ie. the shoulder and hips rotate together) there is a significant loss in club head velocity and thus ball speed and overall length of the shot. This series of events allows players with a shorter, more compact swing to hit the ball as far as or further than someone with a longer swing, because they are going through the proper sequencing to generate peak club head velocity at impact.

A similar thought process can also be applied to a soccer player striking a soccer ball. If a soccer player performs the proper sequence, with the kicking hip moving forwards and leaving the knee behind, followed by the knee coming forwards and the foot “lagging” behind and finally the foot coming through at contact they will be able to increase their ball speed. If everything moves towards the ball at the same time, then there is a significant loss of power in the shot. This relationship holds true due to the summation of the joints!!!

Thanks and check back next week for Principle #4: The greater the applied impulse, the greater the increase in velocity.

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

March 12, 2012

The production of maximum force requires the use of all joints that can be used. When an athlete is attempting to produce maximum force in a sports skill, they are most often trying to throw (ie. a baseball pitcher) or move an object (ie. hitting a golf ball) in order to impart maximum velocity in the object.

There are a couple of different ways to put this principle into practice, but the easiest way to understand the meaning behind the principle is to take a sports skill and eliminate the principle from the skill. For example, if you look at the developmental progressions of an athlete throwing a ball from the very early stages (childhood) to the late stages (adulthood) you will notice how this athlete progresses in terms of their throwing mechanics. When a child first begins to throw a ball (see the video below) you will notice that the child throws the ball from above their head with very little motion coming from the remainder of their body.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DUC6pzPC-I

This is a very primitive movement pattern, but if you take the same child and teach them to start with the ball further back, turn their shoulders to the side and take a step you will notice a significant increase in their ability to throw the ball (see video below).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJStf7YjvbI

As this movement pattern becomes more refined, the athlete will learn to incorporate as many joints as possible in order to generate maximum effort. This will also tie into Principle #3 which will be posted next week. Check out the video below of a 10 year old throwing a baseball. Note the high leg kick, long step and the use of the entire body in the throw.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qh_Sxvfk2J8

Finally, take a look at a this video of Giants pitcher Tim Lincecum as he go throw the same motions as the 10 year old in the previous video but increases the range or motion for the movements, has improved timing and generates more ball velocity by utilizing every joint in his body.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTi6fQ22sH0

The principle of maximum effort can be applied to a wide variety of sports skills and with spring just around the corner we will make reference to the golf swing for a second sports specific example. As a beginning golfer or high handicapper, one of the comments which you might hear from some of your more experienced golfing friends is that “you are not transferring your weight when you hit the ball” or perhaps that “you are only swinging with your arms”. These two comments come directly back to the principle of maximum effort. If you are not transferring your weight from the back leg to the front leg or if you are swinging with just your arms, you almost completely eliminate the lower half of your body from the golf swing. This will have a significant effect on the amount of club head speed you can generate and therefore the distance you can hit the ball. One final golf example to look at is when you are putting the golf ball. With the putter in your hand, very rarely are you attempting to produce maximum effort (unless of course your name is John Daly - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwzTGHN7tVI). As a result of this, you are no longer looking to “use as many joints that can be used to produce maximum effort” but rather looking to develop a controlled movement pattern which is easy to reproduce and control. As a result, the putting stroke is taught as a pendulum from the shoulders and all other joints are left out of the stroke. In putting, the more moving parts you have the harder it is to reproduce the stroke and gain the desired consistency.

Check back next week for more information on Principle #3…

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

March 9, 2012

Click on the link below to view the article (pgs. 16-17) written by Making Stridz Athlete Development in the spring edition of Hockey Calgary Magazine.

http://www.hockeymagazine.net/calgary.html

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

March 7, 2012

Check out the link below to find an article written on Biomechanics in Hockey (pg. 23) for the Spring Edition of the Hockey Edmonton Magazine!!

http://www.hockeymagazine.net/edmonton.html

Hope you enjoy the article!

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

March 5, 2012

The principle of stability can be applied to almost all athletes no matter what sport or activity they are participating in. Stability is defined as resistance to both linear and angular acceleration, or resistance to disruption of equilibrium. In most cases, athletes are trying to increase their stability in order to prevent movement (ie. an offensive lineman in football is trying to get into a stable position in order to prevent the defensive lineman from pushing through them), however, in some cases, athletes are trying to become very unstable in order to improve movement (ie. sprinter or swimmer coming out of the starting blocks will become very unstable in the direction they are moving in order to have a more explosive start). We will come back to these examples later but it is important realize that there are several variables which can increase or decrease an athlete’s stability.

The first mechanical factor to consider is mass. When looking at an athlete’s mass, it is important to consider Newton’s 2nd Law of Motion, Force = Mass x Acceleration. Therefore, if an athlete has more mass, it will subsequently require more force to cause that athlete to accelerate. In terms of stability, this would suggest that a heavier athlete would have more stability than a lighter athlete due to the fact that it would be harder to push this athlete and cause movement (more difficult to disrupt their equilibrium). When looking at the mass of an athlete, there is very little which can be done to increase the athlete’s mass for improved stability.

The second factor to consider is the athlete’s base of support. An athlete’s base of support is the area enclosed by the outermost edges of the body in contact with the supporting surface. When you are standing on two feet, your base of support is the area between your two feet. In order to increase your base of support you could put one hand (three point stance) or both hands (four point stance) on the ground, however, if you wanted to decrease your base of support, you could stand on one foot. This is common in football players when they put their hands on the ground to increase their base of support.

The third factor to consider is the height of the athlete’s center of gravity. Your center of gravity when standing is located approximately at your belly button. When an athlete lowers there center of gravity they increase their stability and when they move their center of gravity upwards, they decrease their stability. The easiest way to improve an athlete’s stability is to encourage them to “flex” or “bend” their knees. If you are a running back in football preparing for a head on collision with a defensive end, in most cases you will have less mass then the opposing player, but you can lower you center of gravity to improve your chances of a successful outcome. This can be achieved by flexing at the hips and knees immediately before the collision.

The final factor to consider is the position of the center of gravity relative to the base of support. If an athlete positions there center of gravity directly in the middle of their base of support, they will be in the most stable position possible. However, if you move this center of gravity towards the outer most edge of the base of support you decrease your overall stability. An athlete can position their center of gravity towards the direction of force application (ie. the running back preparing to be hit by a defensive lineman might move their center of gravity towards the front edge of their base of support in order to be more stable in direction which the force application is coming from) or an athlete can position their center of gravity away from the direction of force application (ie. sprinter during the start will have their center of gravity in front of their feet and then lift the hands off the ground in order to be in a position where their center of gravity is outside of their base of support prior to applying force into the blocks with the feet).

Sport Specific Examples:

In the sport of hockey, athletes who skate in a low, flexed position are more stable and as a result more difficult to move off of the puck. A classic example of manipulating your stability in the sport of hockey is a forward driving to the net against a defenseman. Next time you get a chance to watch an NHL game, watch a player like Taylor Hall as he drives to the net. Taylor does an excellent job of getting into a low, flexed position with a wide base of support and he moves his center of gravity towards the inside edge of his base. These three motions make it extremely difficult for the defender to knock him off balance as the defender would have to move Hall’s center of gravity all the way across his wide base of support.

Stability plays an extremely important role in wrestling, mixed martial arts, judo, etc. In these combat sports, the athlete who is able to get into a low, flexed position with a wide base of support is in an advantageous position as this makes it very challenging on their opponent as they must match this low, flexed position.

When working with swimmers, the goal of the start is to have the athlete go from a very stable position to a very unstable position in the shortest time possible. Similar to the block start in sprinting, swimmers want to move their center of gravity well outside of their base of support (which immediately following the starters pistol should be the two feet at the back of the starting block as the hands are lifted off the ground) and towards the direction which they are travelling (towards the water). This motion allows the swimmer to be more explosive during the start as this instability helps to improve their force application.

For more information on the stability and how it applies to the sport you play or coach in, please contact us.

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

March 5, 2012

Over the past couple of weeks I have spent quite a bit of time thinking about getting “back to basics” when it comes to both performance enhancement and injury prevention as it relates to Biomechanics. During the initial stages of any biomechanical changes, it is important for the athlete to visualize and conceptualize what changes they want to make as well as why these changes are important for both their short term and long term goals. For example, a runner might want to modify their foot strike position in order to decrease their risk of injury, help prevent a recurring injury from coming back or improve their time in a specific event. With that being said, what does it mean to get “back to basics” in the field of Biomechanics. Over the next couple of weeks, I will be posting information on a variety of “Basic Biomechanical Principles”, seven to be exact, as well as some examples of how this principle might be interpreted in a variety of different sports and activities.

Biomechanical Principles:

Stability

Principle #1:

The lower the center of gravity, the larger the base of support, the closer the line of gravity to the center of the base of support, and the greater the mass, the more STABILITY increases.

Maximum Effort

Principle #2:

The production of maximum force requires the use of all the joints that can be used.

Principle #3:

The production of maximum velocity requires the use of joints in order – from the largest to the smallest.

Linear Motion

Principle #4:

The greater the applied impulse, the greater the increase in velocity.

Principle #5:

Movement usually occurs in the direction opposite that of the applied force.

Angular Motion

Principle #6:

Angular motion is produced by the application of force acting at some distance from an axis (or a torque).

Principle #7:

Angular momentum is constant when an athlete or object is free in the air.

Check back later for more information on each of these Biomechanical Principles.

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

February 27, 2012

Check out this excellent video for anyone looking to assess and develop their QL strength. It does an excellent job of highlighting if an asymmetry is present, focusing on the quality of movement and building up a series of progressions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j79Yvg8WRGI

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

February 24, 2012

If you read the article below, you will find out the difference between strength training and neuromuscular retraining. In order to create a permanent change in a movement pattern, it is believed that a combination of both strength and neuromuscular retraining are included in a client’s program. It sounds very simple, but in order to become a better runner, you need to get both stronger and more effective at controlling your body while you are running in order to improve your running performance and decrease your risk of injury.

Journal of Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy_September2011 - R.Willy

Brian Shackel, MSc

February 6, 2012

The biomechanics of running appears pretty straight forwards upon first glance, but is running really as easy as putting one foot in front of the other! Unfortunately it is not! Next time you are out for a run, pay close attention to the running technique of the person in front of you (or anyone who might pass you) and what you will likely notice is that none of them run the same....so who’s to say what is good and what is bad when it comes to running biomechanics. If you talk to most experts in the field of Biomechanics, coaches or elite level athletes it is very unlikely that they would all pick one specific "runner" and say you should try and run like this! The reason for this is that there are so many variables and factors in the way your body moves that determine how you run (ie. weaknesses, tightness, and muscular imbalances). As a result, these underlying movement impairments will often affect your gait without you (the runner) knowing that compensations are taking place. The human body is capable of doing amazing things and will determine the most effective and efficient way for you to perform the skill. However, this in turn can cause additional stress to specific areas of your body and over time (due to the repetitive nature of running) and may increase the likelihood of becoming injured over the long term. It is important as a runner to consider having your gait analyzed by a trained professional to identify these movement impairments and address any potential weaknesses prior to the start of the spring (consider it a "checkup" or "winter maintenance package" for your new form of travel). And remember it is often cheaper to fix things prior to becoming damaged (especially with your car) and this is also true with your body....there is nothing wrong with seeing a physiotherapist or chiropractor when nothing is hurting at all!! For more information on Gait Analysis, please contact us at the information provided below.

Brian Shackel, MSc

January 23, 2012

Many clients and athletes come out of physiotherapy/chiropractic care with the idea that they will be able to return back to their "normal" training programs without the need for modifications. In some cases this may be true, but in the majority of cases this statement is probably false. How can you be sure that you are 100% safe to return back to your activity or training program following an injury? One of the best ways to ensure that you are ready to enter back into your training program is to have a baseline measure which you can go back to in order to determine whether you are back to your "pre-injury baseline values".

The sporting world has been following this protocol for concussions for quite sometime with their SCAT-2 (Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 2) which is used by Athletic Therapists at the start of the season. This tool is beneficial as it allows the therapist to see if the athlete is able to replicate a similar score prior to allowing the athlete to enter back into the game. But how can we apply this to the way our body moves following a musculoskeletal injury. The simple answer is to have a baseline score which we can compare the athlete to prior to allowing them to return back to their activity or training session. Seems too easy to be true but is this possible....

An excellent tool which has been developed by Physiotherapists Grey Cook and Lee Burton (as well as several other colleagues) is the Functional Movement System (FMS). This screening system allows you to address the "quality of movement in the client by providing them with a numerical score on seven different functional movements". One of the great features of this screening process is that it allows the therapist/trainer/coach an opportunity to quantify each movement and therefore create a baseline numerical score for each client. From this baseline score, the trainer can develop a customizable training program to "address the weakest link in the client’s movement" but also re-screen the client throughout the program, following a break in training or after an injury in order to determine where the client is at from a movement perspective. For example, if the client is compensating around the injured body part, the FMS will highlight this compensation and likely result in a lower score than what was achieved pre-injury. As a result, there are likely modifications which the client should be doing in their program in order to eliminate this compensatory movement pattern and therefore bring them back to the quality of movement which was present prior to the injury If you have not had the opportunity to have an FMS, please contact us to learn more about the service and locations where you can have the FMS completed.

Brian Shackel, MSc

January 11, 2012

The concept of an "integrated support team" has been used in many professions in the past including both the healthcare and sports systems. However, now more than ever, this term has brought the healthcare and sports systems even closer together. An "integrated support team" is a group of experts in their respective professional fields who are brought together to work with an athlete or group of athletes and their coaches. More specifically, this could include a Sports Physician, Physiotherapist, Chiropractor, Strength and Conditioning Coach, Biomechanist, Dietician, Sport Psychologist, Exercise Physiologist, etc. Working as a collaborative group, this team of experts helps to develop this athlete by providing input on their individual area of expertise. So why has this approach become so popular over the last 3-4 years...

The main reason is probably due to the sporting industry becoming far more competitive than it ever has been in the past and the increased attention to detail by both coaches and athletes. As a result, service providers in the sporting industry have become more prevalent and play a more important role in the development of successful athletes. What approach was taken prior to the forming of the integrated support team....

Previously, coaches were required to be the experts in all facets of the athletes training program which in turn may have decreased the coach’s ability to simply coach the athlete. However, with this new approach, the coach has many resources which he can draw on to determine what is best for the athlete and as a group, these "experts" can help move athletes further down the developmental continuum.

If you have any questions regarding integrated support teams or are looking for any members to join your team, please contact us to learn more about our services and extensive list of resources which we can share with you.

Brian Shackel, MSc

January 9, 2012

In this article put out by the NSCA it discusses the Biomechanics of the Squat. One of the more common questions which clients and athletes have regarding their squatting technique is how low is too low. This article helps to address some of these concerns, but with most exercises it is more important to focus on the quality of the whole movement then it is to worry about one specific aspect. Please read the article for more information:

http://www.nsca-lift.org/HotTopic/download/Squat%20Depth.pdf

Each individual athlete or client might have a different end range of motion during their squat, but permitting they have adequate hip functioning, are able to control their hips, knee and ankles in the sagittal plane and can keep their chest upright during the squat, then the athlete should strive for a full range of motion with their squat getting to parallel and even deeper if the movement quality is still present. If you train through a complete range of motion, this will help you to build and develop strength throughout the full range.

Brian Shackel, MSc

January 3, 2012

Happy New Years to everyone from Making Stridz Athlete Development. If you have set a New Year’s Resolution which involves getting into better shape and starting a new exercise program then you are not alone. According to the webMD article below about 1 in every 3 people choose weight loss as their New Year’s Resolution.

http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/features/new-years-resolution-get-fit

Well if your goal is to start into a new exercise program it is extremely important to start into the program knowing where you currently stand and start by setting SMART goals (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Time Orientated). One of the best ways to begin a new exercise program is to have a Functional Movement Screen performed by a certified professional in order to identify areas of weakness, tightness and other compensations. If you start into a program with underlying issues, the likelihood of injury increases significantly and so does the likelihood of dropping out of the program. It is possible to have a New Year’s Resolution that lasts past February 1st!! Contact us to learn more about booking a Functional Movement Screen and best of luck with your fitness (and sports) goals for 2012.

Regards,
Brian Shackel, MSc

December 6, 2011

Looking for christmas gift ideas for the sports enthusiast in your family. Contact us to learn about our christmas specials!

Brian Shackel, MSc
Owner - Making Stridz Athlete Development

December 5, 2011

Check out this video of Phil Kessell taking a snap shot.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1HUUJxZtJU&feature=related

By using a stick which has the proper stiffness for your strength and skill level, you can increase the flex in the stick. This increased flex will allow for more stored energy in the shaft of the stick which will then translate into an increase in force being applied to the puck. With more force being applied to the puck, the puck will experience a greater change in acceleration and therefore the player will have a harder shot. This is what I call making a hockey stick work for you! To find out if you are using the right hockey stick for your strength and skill level, contact us to have a shooting analysis done using our high speed video camera.

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

November 30, 2011

I had the opportunity to attend a demonstration with Bauer Hockey today at the Greater St. Albert Sports Academy. For those of you in the market for new equipment, Bauer Hockey is leading the way with technology and innovation. Here is a link to their new APX composite hockey stick which I had the opportunity to shoot with today.

http://www.bauer.com/blog/index.cfm/2011/10/5/VAPOR-APX-Stick

Brian Shackel, MSc
Owner - Making Stridz Athlete Development

November 21, 2011

This past week I had the opportunity to visit the guys at Base Hockey as they were in Edmonton with their mobile analysis. For those of you who have not heard about this company it is definetly worth checking out.

http://www.basehockey.ca/

The guys at Base Hockey will put you through a custom fitting using high speed video to adjust the stiffness of the shaft as well as the lie, rocker and curve of the blade in order to create a custom stick for you. On top of that, you will receive the fully customizable one piece composite stick at factory direct pricing which easily offsets the cost of the initial fitting process. Shooting with a stick built for your individual shooting technique can make a huge difference on your velocity and accuracy.

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

November 10, 2011

Over the last 6-8 months, I have come across a wide variety of athletes from a wide variety of sports but have noticed a common trend amongst their movement. If you watch your athletes closely during their movement, note the position of their knee relative to their hip and ankle when they land from a jump, lunge to reach a ball or simply get into an athletic ready position. One of the key features you need to be looking at is whether or not the athlete is able to stabilize their knee during these motions. The most common motion which occurs at the knee during these movements is medial rotation of the knee or a collapse of the knee towards the inside. This movement increases the athlete's risk of injury significantly as it adds additional strain to the structures within the knee joint. But what is the exact cause of this collapse? There are two schools of thought on what exactly is causing this motion at the knee and in most cases it is possible that both of these factors are playing a role. The first school of thought is that the athlete has weak hip stabilizers (specifically glute med) which causes a collapse of the opposite hip and subsequently the stabilizing knee. The second school of thought is that this motion occurs due to pronation (or collapse) of the foot which causes the stabilizing knee to collapse. So whose fault is it anyways? The answer to this question depends significantly on who you talk to and what their personal philosophy is. Post on our facebook wall or tweet @MakingStridz if you have any thoughts on this topic...

Brian Shackel, MSc
Owner - Making Stridz Athlete Development

November 3, 2011

Are you a runner dealing with shin splints. Here is a brief Q and A session with the fitness experts at Core Performance on ways to deal with recurring shin splits.

http://www.coreperformance.com/daily/recovery/q-a-prevent-shin-splints.html

If you have questions regarding these exercises or are not sure what the cause of the injury is, contact us and we can set up an initial assessment to address these concerns.

Brian Shackel, MSc

October 26, 2011

Here is a link to the Tennis Professional Association's flyer on the high performance workshop which I will be presenting at this week. Looking forwards to working with some of Canada's top coaches during this interactive session.

http://www.tenniscanada.com/tennis_canada/Contents/TPA/Tennis%20Canada%2...

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc

October 25, 2011

In honour of the last week of MLB for the 2010-11 season, I have decided to post a clip to one of my favorite episodes of Sports Science. If you have ever tried to play fastball and baseball at the same time in your career you will know exactly what this clip is talking about, but if you have never played fastball you might be in for a surprise!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_de3HJvO-N8

Brian Shackel, MSc

October 17, 2011

Making Stridz Athlete Development was recently involved in a story which aired on CBC News Edmonton. The story discusses the new skating treadmill which has been installed at Blair Oko's Golf Academy in Edmonton. Making Stridz Athlete Development will be providing video analysis sessions for the Academy in order to improve skating technique and help teach developing athletes about the strengths and weaknesses of their skating stride. The use of video analysis is vital in the development of proper technique, please contact us to learn more about the importance of visual feedback and Biomechanics on athletic development for your sport.

http://www.cbc.ca/video/#/News/Canada/Edmonton/1305516385/ID=2153277388

Regards,
Brian Shackel, MSc, B.E.S.S., FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

October 12, 2011

Click on the link below to read an interesting post from "The Science of Sport" regarding foot strike patterns in runners. Ross Tucker, PhD brings out some interesting points on the Biomechanics of Running and provides some insight into foot strike patterns as the "forefoot running phenomenon" continues to take over the world of running.

http://www.sportsscientists.com/2008/04/running-technique-footstrike.html

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc, B.E.S.S., FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

October 4, 2011

Click on the link below to check out a new high speed video posted by Making Stridz Athlete Development. The video will highlight some functional deficets which are commonly seen in runners. Note the high degree of pronation at the ankle, medial rotation at the hip, as well as the lateral pull which occurs at the knee.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NzNJ76nLHg

Contact us if you have any questions regarding the video or are intersted in having a Biomechanics Assessment!

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc, B.E.S.S., FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

September 29, 2011

Today's post is in honour of one of the most exciting days in Major League Baseball history. Here are a few of the highlights from last night’s MLB action in case you missed it. Boston Red Sox closer Jonathan Papelbon gives up 2 runs in the bottom of the ninth for his first loss of the season in a must win game for the Red Sox after they blew a 9 game lead in the Wild Card. Meanwhile, Tampa Bay comes back from a 7-0 deficit after 7 innings to force their must win game into extra innings and immediately after the Red Sox loss is announced in Tampa Bay, Rays slugger Evan Longoria hits a line drive walk off home run to send them into the post season. On the other side of the league, the St. Louis Cardinals took care of business with an 8-0 shutout loss to complete their comeback from 8.5 games back in the Wild Card. Their post season berth rests on the hands of the Atlanta Braves who are leading 3-2 going into the bottom of the ninth and their closer gives up one run, forcing extra innings. In the bottom of the thirteenth inning, the Atlanta Braves surrender a run to lose the game and complete the epic collapse. Two teams poised for post season at the start of September both lose on the final day in heart breaking fashion to write an unbelievable story for future generations. In light of the walk off home run by Longaria, here is a sports science clip on hitting home runs.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9CEuJ5e2cM

Sincerley,
Brian Shackel, MSc, B.E.S.S., FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

September 19, 2011

Join Making Stridz Athlete Development in the land of Social Media. You can now follow us on Twitter, lke us on Facebook and watch us on Youtube. Just click on the button on the bottom right side of the homepage to join us.

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc, BSc, FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

September 16, 2011

Click on the link below to check out a new video posted on the Making Stridz Athlete Development Youtube page. This is a sample high speed video of a skilled forward performing a 90 degree change of direction in hockey using a classic stop with a crossover start.

http://www.youtube.com/user/MakingStridz

Brian Shackel, MSc, BSc, FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

September 12, 2011

With the end of summer nearing and many runners thinking of what to do as the "off season" rolls around. Making Stridz Athlete Development is now offering Biomechanical Gait Analysis Sessions. The sessions can be custom fit to work around your busy lifestyle and are beneficial as we will help to identify faulty running mechanics, underlying areas of tightness or weakness and compensation patterns which might increase the runners risk of injury. The goal of all Biomechanics Analysis is to decrease the risk of injury while improving an athletes overall performance. If you are training as an individual or with a large group, please contact us about what we can do for you this fall!

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc, BSc, FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

August 30, 2011

The Titleist Performance Institute explains the correct hip action during the golf swing in this video. Note the emphasis on hip rotation during the takeaway, through the transition, and during the downswing.

http://youtu.be/cKnqad8S7Wk

Brian Shackel, MSc, BSc, FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

August 25, 2011

Making Stridz Athlete Development would like to Welcome the Students, Parents and Teachers from the Greater St. Albert Sports Academy. Making Stridz Athlete Development will be providing on site video analysis services to the soccer and hockey academies. We look forwards to working with you throughout the entire school year and wish the best of luck to all of the athletes who are trying out for their respective teams this fall.

Here is a link to their website. Contact them for more information on what their academy has to offer to prospective students looking to get involved with a sports academy.

http://sportsacademy.gsacrd.ab.ca

Sincerely,
Brian Shackel, MSc, BSc, FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

July 18, 2011

A second date for the skating mechanics assessment has been added for Wednesday August 3rd at 10:00 AM at the Argyll Arena. Please contact us to register for this session or the Saturday August 6th session. Limited spots are available for both sessions.

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc, BSc, FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

July 14, 2011

Making Stridz Athlete Development is now scheduling on ice skating mechanics assessments for both forwards and defenseman. The sessions are being scheduled for August 2011 and will take place at the Argyll Arena. The assessments will include the following skills:

Forwards Skating Assessment:
-Forwards Skating Stride
-90 Degree Direction Change
-Tight Turns
-Pro Agility Test

Defenseman Skating Assessment:
-Backwards Skating Stride
-90 Degree Direction Change
-Backwards to Forwards Transition
-Pro Agility Test

The pro agility assessment is the same assessment used by Hockey Canada, where an athlete is required to do multiple forwards to backwards (and backwards to forwards) transitions while maintaining puck control during a timed event.

The athlete will be provided a CD with the full skating mechanics assessment including body positions, joint angles, and time to complete the skills. The assessment will highlight strengths and weaknesses in the athletes skating stride as well as help to provide cues for technique correction. The athlete will also be scheduled to come in for a one on one meeting to go through the assessment with our skating mechanics expert.

Benefits:
•Improved skating mechanics and efficiency
•Improved body awareness
•Improved method of measuring and tracking progress
•Improved method for athlete comparison (to other athletes or themselves at a later date)

The full assessment cost is $175.00 plus tax which includes the on ice filming session, CD, and player meeting. Sessions are limited to 8 athletes per group with the first session scheduled for Saturday August 6th at 10:00 AM. Small group or individual sessions are available by request at a rate to be determined based on ice availability and cost. The deadline to register for the skating mechanics assessment is Saturday July 30th. If you have any questions or are interested in registering for the Skating Mechanics Assessment, please contact as at 780-932-2903 or shackel.brian@gmail.com

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc, BSc, FMS, MES
Founder – Making Stridz Athlete Development

July 11, 2011

Making Stridz Athlete Development would like to thank Hockey Canada for the invitation to speak at the Hockey Canada Skills Academy Conference this past week in Calgary. Hopefully all of the delegates were able to take home something from the session which they can incoorperate into their programs. If you were unable to attend but would like to see a sample of what was discussed at the session, please feel free to view the sample video analysis project located at the top of the homepage. If you have any video from your own program which you would like to have analyzed, please feel free to contact us about our web-based video analysis program.

Regards,
Brian Shackel, MSc, BSc, FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

June 27, 2011

Congratulations to Niki Oudenaarden on being named to the Canadian team heading to the World Youth Track and Field Championship from July 6 - 10 in Lille, France. Niki will be competing in the Heptathlon which she currently holds the 7th best point total in the World and the top point total within Canada. Making Stridz Athlete Development would like to wish Niki (and all of the other Canadian Athletes) the best of luck at their upcoming competition.

Brian Shackel, MSc, B.E.S.S., FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

June 15, 2011

Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Playoffs goes tonight with the Boston Bruins heading back to Vancouver to face the Canucks. At this point in the season, every cliche in the book has been used by both teams including some of my favorites:

"It's the last game of the season. Can't hold anything back now."

"We just have to take it one shift at a time"

and finally.....

"We just have to put more pucks in the back of their net then they put in the back of ours"

I am willing to bet there is a lot more than a few old fashioned hockey cliches that is going to determine the winner of the game tonight. Here are a few additional things that great athlete's are able to do to help them perform better in Game 7:

1. Sports Psychology - A good athlete will be able to incoorperate the skills they have learned off the ice in order to perform better on the ice (ie. goal setting, confidence, concentration, visualization, etc.) Here is a link for information on Sport Psychology:

http://www.rivervalleycounselling.ca/Site/Welcome.html

2. Strength and Conditioning - At this point in the season Vancouver will be playing in their 105th game and Boston will be playing in their 107th game. The work that the players have put into their off season strength and conditioning programs as well as their ability to maintain muscle mass in season will play a crucial role in determining what is left in the tank. Here is a link for more information on Strength and Conditioning:

http://www.premierstrength.com/

3. Recovery and Nutrition - Rest and recovery is one of the most important aspects of any athlete whether they are in the peak of their competitive season or in the off season. Our bodies need time to repair damaged muscle tissues and need the proper nutrients to do so in an appropriate time frame. Here is a link for more information in Nutrition:

http://www.balancenutrition.ca

4. Biomechanics - It is important that athlete's perform at the most effecient level possible at this point in the season. Athlete's who expend too much energy during the small, less signficant plays of the game often times will not have the extra gear when it matters the most. Athlete's need to know that they are skating in a powerful, efficient position which enables them to get that extra gear when they need it. It is also important that athlete's have trained the appropriate motor patterns in order to make these movement reactive and not anticipatory.

Reactive movements are movements which will occur automatically when the athlete needs them to (ie. planting the support skate with 90 degrees of knee flexion) whereas anticipatory movements are those which the athlete has to think about prior to the movement occuring. At this stage of the year, the athlete must have all technical aspects occuring reactively in order to focus on the tactical aspect of the game (ie. defensive positioning, finding soft areas on the ice, etc.). With all this being said, each athlete will rely on a combination of skills in order to get them through the game and those athletes who are able to combine all of these skills are more likely to be succesful.

Brian Shackel, MSc, B.E.S.S., FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

April 7, 2011

Making Stridz Athlete Development is now offering Functional Movement Screening to athletes and teams in the Edmonton area. For more information on what is included with a Functional Movement Screen, how it can be incoorperated into your current training program, and prices please contact Making Stridz Athlete Development.

Brian Shackel, MSc, B.E.S.S., FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

April 1, 2011

Congratulations to Marc McCoy a former Featured Athlete at www.makingstridz.com for being recalled to the Red Deer Rebels as they move forwards into the WHL playoffs. We worked quite aggressively on Marc's forwards skating stride using both technical corrections and rehabilitation in order to gain proper hip functioning. Marc has been tagged one of the top prospects in the Red Deer Rebels organization with his strength, power and skating being his greatest assets. For more information on Marc and other Red Deer Rebels prospects please click on the following link.

http://www.albertalocalnews.com/reddeeradvocate/sports/Prospecting_with_...

Brian Shackel, MSc, B.E.S.S., FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

February 27, 2011

Under Armour attempts to take performance analysis to the next level with their new performance clothing to be trialed at the NFL combine this spring. Read the article below to find out more information.

http://www.wired.com/playbook/2011/02/nfl-combine-chest-sensors/

Sincerley,
Brian Shackel, MSc, B.E.S.S., FMS, MES
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

February 24, 2011

I recently wrote the Medical Exercise Specialist (MES) certification exam through the American Academy of Health, Fitness and Rehab Professionals. The MES certification provides a great understanding of the rehabilitation protocols, risk factors and guidelines for dealing with clients or athletes who are returning to work or play following an injury. The MES is certified to deal with the rehabilitation of clients and/or athletes who have been cleared by their physiotherapist or chiropractor to begin an exercise program. Combining the MES certification with the Functional Movement Screen has provided me with a great understanding of how to correct movement impairments, rehab injuries and create a well-balanced athlete. It is essential that any athlete returning from an injury has an equal amount of mobility and stability in order to minimize the risk of future injuries.

Brian Shackel, MSc, B.E.S.S., FMS, MES
Founder, Making Stridz Athlete Development

February 1, 2011

If you had a chance to watch this past weekends NHL Skills Competition and specifically the fastest skater event, you might have noticed a variety of different skating styles. However, if you look closely at the two fastest skaters in the competition Michael Grabner of the New York Islanders and Taylor Hall of the Edmonton Oilers they were able to do utilize a couple of different strategies during the race which put them in the final. Both skaters were able to demonstrate a very effective quick start with a high stride turnover and up onto their toes as they initiated the start. The skaters both showed an excellent ability to keep the feet moving going into the first turn and get into long, powerful strides during the back strightaway. Both athletes showed incredible knee flexion in their support skate and emphasized a wide, sideways directed push off. As they entered the second corner, the skaters were able to keep their feet moving and not lose any speed as the came out of the corner. Finally, as they came down the final straightway there was an emphasis on skating in a low, flexed position and getting every ounce of power out of each push off. These characteristics allow both Grabner and Hall to be two of the fastest skaters in the league, not only at the NHL Skills Competition but in the NHl every single night.

Brian Shackel, MSc
Founder, Making Stridz Athlete Development

January 31, 2011

This past weekend I had the oppertunity to attend the World Cup of Freestyle Skiing event in Calgary, Alberta. For those of you who have never experienced Moguls or Arials live I suggest you consider doing this in the near future. The athlete's are incredibly skilled and show charactersitics of the most talented athletes in the world; strength, speed, agility and exceptional biomechanics. Canada had an exceptional showing winning Gold (Mikael Kingsbury) and Silver (Alex Bilodeau) in men's moguls, Gold (Warren Shouldice) in men's arials, and Silver (Audrey Robichaud) in women's moguls. I also had the oppertunity to meet Jennifer Heil and her incredible family who were all down in Calgary to support her following her recent retirement announcement. I would like to wish the Canadian Freestyle Ski team all the best at next weeks World Championships in Salt Lake City Utah.

Brian Shackel, MSc
Founder - Making Stridz Athlete Development

January 13, 2011

Go to this link to check out an incredible display of skill by European Golf Prefessional!!

http://www.dump.com/2010/12/23/the-clay-pigeon-golf-shot-video/

December 2, 2010

Making Stridz Athlete Development is pleased to announce that as of January 1st, 2011 athletes will now have the oppertunity to upload their personal videos to www.makingstridz.com for a comprehensize analysis. For more information on the protocal, fees and how the service will be conducted please contact us directly at shackel.brian@gmail.com, 780-932-2903 or find out more information under the Biomechanics tab on the website.

Regards,
Brian Shackel, Msc
Owner - Making Stridz Athlete Development

November 29, 2010

Making Stridz Athlete Development would like to congratulate Warren Kean of the Saskatchewan Roughriders for making his first appearance in the Grey Cup. Warren went 1/1 on field goals (27 yards) and 2/2 on extra points in a 21-18 loss to the Montreal Alouettes.

Brian Shackel, MSc
Owner, Making Stridz Athlete Development

October 18, 2010

It's that time of year again with the hockey season getting into full swing. With that being said, every game becomes critical in the success or failure of a teams season. To take your teams execution to the next level contact Making Stridz Athlete Development regarding their Game Analysis Package. The Game Analysis Package includes the filming of the game, a full DVD of the game, a DVD of the game broken down into the key aspects (ie. PP, PK, Goals For, Goals Against, etc.) and a list of important clips. Book Making Stridz Athlete Development for your next game and receive the Season Starter Package for $199.99 plus tax. Book five games or more and receive 10% off of your total order. Book before October 31st to recieve this special offer.

Regards,
Brian Shackel, MSc
Owner - Making Stridz Athlete Development

September 21, 2010

Making Stridz Athlete Development is now certified to administer the Grey Cook Functional Movement Screen for all of your Athletic Development needs. The screen is utilized as an assessment tool in order to develop a well balanced and functionally strong athlete. The majority of athletes become "overpowered" during their training which presents a very dangerous situation in which the athlete is too powerful or explosive to control their body. As a result, it is important that athletes get back to basics and re-learn their fundamental movement patterns in order to regain better mobility, stability and eliminate any muscle imbalances. The role of the Functional Movement Screen is to address the "weakest link" in the athlete and provide "corrective movement" exercises in order to eliminate any restrictions or imbalances which might be identified during the screen.

For more information on Functional Movement Screening please contact Brian at shackel.brian@gmail.com or 780-932-2903.

Brian Shackel, MSc
Owner - Making Stridz Athlete Development

September 14, 2010

I had the oppertunity this past weekend to attend the Functional Movement Screening (FMS) Course in Calgary Alberta. The role of the FMS course is to provide the personal trainer with the oppertunity to make a more in depth assessment of an athlete or clients mobility, stability and functional movement. Once the assesment is complete, the trainer will begin to provide exercises to address the "weakest link" with the goal of correcting all of the limitations which showed up in the assessment. This is important as it eliminates any muscle imbalances while improving the stability and mobility of the athlete or client which in turn will result in a more "functional athlete".

For more information on Functional Movement Screening or to schedule an assessment please contact Brian Shackel at shackel.brian@gmail.com or 780-932-2903.

Brian Shackel, MSc
Owner - Making Stridz Athlete Development

August 12, 2010

Making Stridz Athlete Development would like to thank the players and parents from the Subar Power Skating Bantam Bootcamp. The one week bootcamp provided athletes with an oppertunity to experience Nutrition Seminars, Sports Psychology Sessions, Biomechanics Sessions (both on and off ice video sessions), Strength and Conditioning, Power Skating Instruction and Skill Development Sessions. The camp was a great success and I look forwards to being involved with the Subar Power Skating team in the future!

Brian Shackel, MSc
Owner - Making Stridz Athlete Development

July 20, 2010

Making Stridz Athlete Development would like to welcome parents and players from Hockey Impact Training in Leduc and I look forwards to working with you in the future. Please feel free to contact me with any questions or concerns regarding the services which will be provided at the Hockey Impact Training Center.

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc
Owner - Making Stridz Athlete Development

July 7, 2010

Making Stridz Athlete Development would like to Welcome all participants of the Paragon Hockey Academy to the website. Making Stridz has been assisting the Paragon team with both on ice and off ice training in order to aid in the correction of movement patterns. Improving mechanics off ice plays a crucial role in athletic development and will allow an athlete to develop the proper strength, stability and mobility to perform their on ice skills at the most effecient level possible.

Thanks,
Brian Shackel, MSc
Owner - Making Stridz Athlete Development

June 10, 2010

Making Stridz Athlete Development has worked quite closely with the athlete below in regards to his forwards skating mechanics. During the initial skating assessment it was evident that the athlete showed a 10 degree asymmetry between his left and right sides during the push off. Specifically, the athlete showed 36 degrees of hip abduction on the left side and only 26 degrees of hip abduction on the right side. This asymmetry resulted in a hitch in the athletes skating stride as the left leg was performing a long powerful push off while the right push off was very short and choppy in nature. The image below shows the athlete’s initial filming session at the top with limited hip abduction and the improved hip abduction present during the second filming session.

MarcLeftPushComp.jpg

This athlete was able to make significant changes in his skating stride by working on a specific movement correction program which focused on the quality of movement over the quantity of movement. This program was facilitated by a strength and conditioning specialist who focused heavily on improving the athlete’s hip mobility and stability as well as improving the athlete’s core stability. This program was important for improving the athlete’s range of motion which was then translated onto the ice during the athletes skating stride. The image below shows the similar discrepancy in the athletes skating stride with the top image being the initial assessment and the bottom image the post treatment filming session.

MarcRightComp.jpg

It is also important to note the improvement in the athletes knee flexion as he was able to increase the range of motion or the length of his skating stride. The athlete still has room for improvement in his skating stride as there continues to be a 10 degree asymmetry between the left and right sides. This discrepency will continue to be monitered with a greater emphasis placed on improving the funtion of the athletes right hip. For more information on the exercise program and how you could experience a significant change in your sports performance please contact us at shackel.brian@gmail.com or 780-932-2903.

April 6, 2010

What is Biomechanics?

Biomechanics is the science concerned with the internal and external forces acting on the human body and the effects produced by these forces. More specifically, Biomechanics is the study of human movement and describes the forces which cause this movement.

What is the role of Biomechanics?

Biomechanics can play a crucial role in both injury prevention as well as performance enhancement. It is important for athletes of all ages and skill levels to understand the importance of education to develop proper mechanics. Education can come in multiple forms, but with the emphasis on the visual learner in today’s society, visual feedback is one of the most effective ways to modify an athlete’s technique and allow them to perform at the most efficient level possible. An athlete’s ability to perform efficiently and injury free are two key features in performance outcome and can both be improved with Biomechanical analysis.

Who can benefit from Biomechanical Analysis?

Biomechanical analysis can benefit athletes of all ages and skill levels. Whether you are a weekend runner or a high performance sprinter, biomechanical analysis can be beneficial to you as it will allow you the opportunity to develop more efficient movement patterns. This can benefit the weekend runner by allowing them to increase their distance and run pain free, while the high performance sprinter can benefit from a more efficient running stride and allow them to shave milliseconds of off their personal best time.

How to get the most out of your biomechanics sessions?

Biomechanics and video analysis specifically works best when the athlete makes use of multiple video analysis sessions. The theory behind multiple video analysis sessions comes from scientific research using pre testing, intervention and post testing. During a Biomechanics session, our Biomechanist will break down the video and make recommendations on how to improve your performance. This will be the pre-test portion of the experiment. Following the initial filming session, you will have the opportunity to make the necessary adjustments to your mechanics and work closely with our team of exercise therapists in order to correct your movement pattern. This will be the intervention portion of the experiment. Lastly, the athlete will undergo post testing where another video analysis session will be performed in order to determine the outcome of the intervention. During the second filming session, our Biomechanist will perform a pre and post test comparison in order to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. This cycle is important in creating good results as it will allow the athlete to not only see, but feel how the correct movement pattern should be performed.

April 1, 2010

Making Stridz Athlete Development was honoured to be a guest speaker at the 2010 Women's Wellness Conference in Sherwood Park, Alberta on March 20,2010. The conference was put on by Strathcona County and featured speakers from across Alberta on a variety of wellness topics including yoga, gardenening, laughter and relaxation techniques. Making Stridz presented on the "Mechanics of the Golf Swing and Golf Fitness for Women"

We had a great turnout and thanks to all the ladies for their participation.

March 17, 2010

Making Stridz Athlete Development is pleased to announce their partnership with Louis St. Laurent Hockey Academy for the 2010 school year. The Louis St. Laurent Hockey Academy has put togethor an excellent staff for this upcoming season including strength and conditioning coach Barry Butt from Premier Strength, goaltending consultants Dave Rathjen and Jamie McCaig from Above the Crease Goaltending, sports psychologist Nicolas Allan from River Valley Counselling as well as coaches Rick Swan, Larry Draper and Jaret Peel. If anyone is looking for a senior high hockey academy for next season please check out their website at www.baronshockeyacademy.com.

January 27, 2010

Making Stridz Athlete Development is now on Facebook. Check us out @ http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/pages/Edmonton-AB/Making-Stridz-Athle...

June 4, 2009

download.pngClick here to view a Promo Video done by Making Stridz Athlete Development

May 26, 2009

As the director of Making Stridz Athlete Development I would like to thank everyone for visiting the site as well as for your support throughout the entire process. I would also like to thank Permaven Software and their team of designers and programmers for working on the site.

April 10, 2009

download.pngClick here to download Dartviewer. This will allow you to access the Dartfish project which has been produced for you by Making Stridz Athlete Development.